Need Help

Question: I have just been diagnosed by my Doctor with having RSI. He suggested that the only way to stop the pain in my hand is to rest it completely – he was going to sign my off work for at least a month. I turned him down at the moment because I feel guilty about taking time off work. The Doctor says that the pain is starting from my fingers so the splint I was using before I went to see him was having no effect at all. He suggested wearing a boxing glove as this would stop me using my fingers!
Has anybody got any suggestions as to what I could do without having to resort to taking time off work (which the Doctor said may not even solve the problem). Any ideas about supports that restrict the movement of my fingers without having to resort to the boxing glove, so that I still can use the hand a bit.
Has anybody any experience of Homeopathy remedies – I’m quite interested in this and wondered if anyone has had any success.
Any help would be appreciated.

Answer 1:  I love the idea of a boxing glove – I’ve wondered for a while whether having a plaster cast on for several weeks would give the wrist the complete rest it probably deserves and so much needs. Love to hear others people’s views on these methods.
There is a lot of equipment you can get for work (keyboards, mice, voice recognition software etc…) to help reduce finger movement. I’m sure loads of advice and support will come flooding in from the list shortly!
Best of luck

Answer 2:  Please do take the Doctor’s advice. You will be surprised at how  rest can help. Do not however accept that as all the Doctor can do  for you. After 3 years of RSI, the battle with the GP’s continues for me and you need to persist to get the best help for you.
I used the splints with the curved metal bar but they did not help. I’ve also tried MediSport wrist supports & Magnetic Wrist Supports which were very good. It really depends on the individual. I’ve been on the guilt trip about work, until my hands got so bad  that I couldn’t hold my baby, then work didn’t seem do important.
Whatever you decide to do…..Health first.

Answer 3: I’ve done the plaster cast thing…..BAD IDEA. Loads of itching & only made the problem worse. They put your arm at a very peculiar angle (how they think this helps I do not know). People still have to function & you just end up with worse problems in the arms not in a cast.
Waste of time.

Answer 4:  Thanks for that. I shall quickly forget the idea – itching and scratching would drive me potty!

Answer 5:  I have just been diagnosed by my Doctor with having RSI. He suggested that the only way to stop the pain in my hand is to rest it completely he was going to sign my off work for at least a month.
My doctor said the same thing, and he was wrong. Please bear in mind that your doctor might be wrong too. Rest did very little to help my RSI, but physiotherapy got it under control. My physiotherapist has never told me to rest, or type less.
My RSI is healing from:
o Stretches (prescribed by physiotherapist)
o Correcting my posture (ditto)
o Using a ‘natural’ keyboard
o Finding a nice mouse
o Regular breaks (I have a program that stops me from typing every half an hour for five minutes)
RSI is not a sports injury, but a repetitive strain injury. So while wearing splints and tubes may seem like an obvious solution they will make many RSI problems much worse in the long term. See an RSI specialist! Physiotherapy worked for me.

Answer 6:  There is no one right answer to this. First, rest is important. _Stopping doing what caused the injury is crucial_. My GP’s suggestion was that I carry on at work but without typing: that I simply do the teaching part of my job. He was right, I know. But my employers turned that down, said — in more legalistic language than this — that it was all the job or nothing.
So I rested. That does help. Believe me, it does. It was less good for me than carrying on with a modified job, though. What does not help long term is total immobilization during that “rest” period. I am told physio. would not have helped me. If you have soft tissue injuries, it won’t. A specially made cast or splint — US patients get them — would have. Otherwise, well, casts and splints have helped some people — splints helped me later — not others.
In many cases physio. is indeed the answer. Again, not all physios are good. Because RSI is more than one thing — nerve damage, soft tissue damage, tendon damage, damage of the tendons over the sheaths, e.g. — treatment and approach have to vary.
So — this is the positive and optimistic part of my post! — if one thing does not work, don’t assume something else won’t. Something that didn’t work for other people may work for you.
Good luck, have a reasonable holiday if you can — happy holidays to everybody here, I’ll probably be off-line for a week

Answer 7:  Please take your doctor’s advice and have a rest. A break from whatever is causing your problems will only do you good. Continuing to struggle on will probably do you more harm.
I also now have problems holding my baby. I have been suffering with RSI problems now for about 8 years and it is really upsetting for both my son and I when I am unable to lift him up for a hug. I wish I had not been subject to work hassling me to go back earlier than I should’ve done. I’m really regretting this now and so sorry that I am too conscientious about my work.
Physio doesn’t actually work for me – well certainly the physio that I had didn’t anyway and the girl who was doing it actually recommended that I receive no more as it was causing me more pain than relief.  Rest is the only thing that seems to help me, that and my TENS machine. Please listen to your body and what it’s trying to tell you. Hope you have as good a weekend as you can,
All the best

Answer 8:  I’ve done the plaster cast thing…..BAD IDEA. Loads of itching & only made the problem worse. They put your arm at a very peculiar angle (how they think this helps I do not know).
I’ve had plaster casts twice – for teno by an osteopath. on both occasions the intense pain stopped and I was able to continue working. The wrists were at a ‘normal’ angle and the thumbs (affected digit) fixed in the position that they had jammed. The forced rest promoted healing and was followed by the use of splints ‘when necessary’.  For me this treatment was excellent and worked.


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