Wales

Question: You should hear what some Americans have said about Windsor. They seem to have much more emotionally invested in it that I do. I only live near there after all. One actual, I-was-there-I-heard-it-I-swear-this-is-true comment: “Nice castle. Such a pity they built it so close to the airport”. My household has one Welsh-English lady and one Scottish-English one. Rugby days are interesting… Not in my experience. In Stockholm a -20 dry cold caused no problems. OTOH -2 wet in London caused a lot of pain. I worked in Baglan Bay once; it was pretty sunny the whole time. You could see the sun glinting off the chemical works most mornings, and I don’t remember any rain on the drive to work past the oil refinery and steel works. OTOH, Northern and Western Wales I remember as a little damp, but not by any means sodden, and quite beautiful in any weather.

Answer 1: You could see the sun glinting off the chemical works most mornings, and I don’t remember any rain on the drive to work past the oil refinery and steel works. Grahame, what a wonderful picture you pain of ‘sunny Wales’. Talking of Americans and their sense of history (?!) my husband was appalled to be asked by some American where the ‘Elevator’ was to get to the top of St Paul’s (is it the Whispering Gallery?)! She was apparently absolutely horrified that she had to climb the stairs! Bless ’em eh?

Answer 2: I heard a classic quote from our friends on a guide bus in York – “How do they make the walls look so old?”!!!!! I’ll never forget that day – I got off the bus in tears of laughter!

Answer 3: Thanks for the laughter this afternoon everyone – I really need it today – I’m having a really lousy afternoon and am very grateful for the giggles. Cheers for now

Answer 4: I just got the joke re: Taffia…….groans! It was a joke (hesitant), wasn’t it?

Answer 5: True as Shane Howarth’s ancestry.

Answer 6: Decidedly off topic … Dry Cold weather report on First Day of Spring: Not all snow is “dry cold”. We don’t often get dry cold. We have freezing rain, sleet, hail, wet snow, soft snow, powdery snow, flurries, driving snow, snow storm, blizzard, whiteout, silver thaw (pretty, when trees start to drip and then freeze) – to name but a few (and Quebec had Ice Storm in 1998). We had wet snow this weekend, hard to shovel, and hard on RSI and arthritis (very common here). Some of us have mechanical snow blowers which are terrible for RSI, if not promote it (vibration). Labrador, OTOH, has dry cold, blue skies, sunshine but the ice crackles in your nose when you breathe. Newfoundland is foggy, damp and changeable, except for the snow it is not unlike … and instead of wild ponies we have moose on the highway, and the occasional polar bear comes inland and one recently got shot because they were afraid it would attack someone. Now there is an outcry, because some say it should not have been shot, would not have hurt anyone … it came ashore in the evening, so they wildlife officials (who shot it), could not take any chances. As I said, off topic!


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