Wrists getting cold

Question: A symptom that I have, and am keen to know that other readers comments on it are, is that my wrists go very cold at this time of year. This could be a circulatory problem or there could be some form of RSI – the doctor does not know. Does anyone else suffer this or have any advice where else to look for info on it?

Answer 1: Also my wrist goes very cold, especially in this time of the year. It is normal with RSI that the skin feels cold at the hurting spots. I try to keep them warm by wearing gloves or keeping my hands in my pockets when I am outside. By keeping the hands warm, the wrists do not get too cold either. During my work I take breaks to do some exercises. A simple exercise that I like really makes your hands feel warm. Place your forearms on your desk (preferably with a pillow under them), palms down. Bring your knuckles (metacarpofalangeal joints) up with your fingers stretched, fingertips remaining on the desk (making a triangular shape). Then bring your knuckles down while keeping your fingertips at the same position; this bends your fingers. Then stretch your fingers again and repeat a few times. Give it a try, good luck.

Answer 2: I don’t think wrists and hands getting cold are a normal symptom of RSI. My wrists and hands don’t get any colder than they did before. I hardly ever wear gloves now, because putting them on hurts, wearing them hurts, they won’t fit over my splints but don’t fit that well under them, sulk… and I’m not getting desperately cold. Splints. I don’t wear mine all the time. I should have said that. But while I have trained my wrists pretty well, I still do need the splints. That may be because I also need thumb support.

Answer 3: It would be interesting to find out how many people get cold hands and how many hot due to RSI. Personally, I seem to suffer from hot spots and cold spots on my hands/wrists, often within a few centimeters of each other, and just to complicate things even further, hot spots turn cold and vice versa. If I’ve used my hands too much, the fingers tend to go icy cold at first, then very hot, and then alternate between the two states.


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